THE PLAYING OF TAPS
 
“Taps” is an American Bugle call, composed by the Union Army’s Brigadier General Daniel Butterfield while in camp at Harrison’s Landing Virginia, in 1862. Butterfield wrote the call to replace the earlier “Tattoo” (lights out), which he thought too formal. The call soon became known as “Taps” because it was often tapped out on a drum in the absence of a bugler. Within the year both the North and South Army’s were playing “Taps” at the burial of their solders. “Taps” was officially adopted by the U.S. Army in 1874.
 
“Taps” is now played by the military at burial and memorial services of active duty personnel and veterans that served their country honorably and to signal “lights out” at day’s end.
 
Taps
Day is done, gone the sun, From the hills, from the lake,
From the skies. All is well, safely rest, God is nigh.

 

Funeral of Bronze Star Recipient
L/Cpl Richard G Perez U.S.M.C. Ret.

PRESENTATION OF BURIAL FLAG
 
The United States Flag drapes the casket of deceased veterans to honor their service to America. The flag is placed so that the blue field with stars is at the head over the left shoulder of the deceased. When there is no casket, then the flag may be draped over a table or held by one of the Honor Guard members.
 
After the rifle salute (Optional) and the playing of Taps, the flag is carefully folded into the symbolic tri-cornered shape. When folded no red or white stripes are to be evident, leaving only the blue field with stars.
 
The flag is then presented to the next of kin, or other appropriate family member as a keepsake. After the burial flag has been used for a veterans funeral or memorial it should never be flown again or displayed in any way other than in the tri-fold shape in which it was presented to the family of the veteran. The burial flag should never be opened again.

Congressional Photographer

Ellen Wang

1.Deacon leading the Caisson

2.Caisson

3.Group following the caisson

4.Folding the flag

5.Flag Presentation

The Rifle Team Is From Houston Marines I & I
(Inspector & Instructor)

Folding Flag:

S/Sgt. Gus Allen

L/Cpl. Charles Salazar

Flag Presenter Gunnery Sgt. Andrew Ortiz

Pictures taken by in house
Anna Borbon (board member)

       

U.S. Marine David Lon Cleboski
Friday 30 April 2016

Funeral Forest Park Lawndale Cemetery Houston Texas,

   

The Marines’ Prayer

Almighty Father, whose command is over all and whose love never fails, make me aware of Thy presence and obedient to Thy will. Keep me true to my best self, guarding me against dishonesty in purpose in deed and helping me to live so that I can face my fellow Marines, my loved ones and Thee without shame or fear.

Protect my family. Give me the will to do the work of a Marine and to accept my share of responsibilities with vigor and enthusiasm. Grant me the courage to be proficient in my daily performance. Keep me loyal and faithful to my superiors and to the duties my country and the Marine Corps have entrusted to me. Make me considerate of those committed to my leadership. Help me to wear my uniform with dignity, and let it remind me daily of the traditions which I must uphold.

If I am inclined to doubt; steady my faith; if I am tempted, make me strong to resist; if I should miss the mark, give me courage to try again. Guide me with the light of truth and grant me wisdom by which I may understand the answer to my prayer. Amen.



 semper fidelis

What a Wonderful World !
 
I see trees of green, red roses too,
I seen them bloom, for me and you,
and I think to myself what a wonderful world.
 
I see skies of blue and clouds of white,
the bright-blessed day, the dark say good night,
and I think to myself, what a wonderful world.
 
The colors of the rainbow so pretty in the sky,
are also on the faces of people going by.
I see friends shaking hands say how do you do,
their really saying I love you.
 
I hear babies crying, I watch them grow.
They learn much more then I never knew,
and I think to myself what a wonderful world.
 
Yes, I think to myself what a wonderful world.
Oh yeah
 
by Louis Armstrong